Short QT interval may be congenital or acquired .


About the congenital Short QT Interval Syndrome

  This autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in genes encoding the

      potassium ion channels of the cell membrane.

  The patients do not necessarily have structural heart disease.

      Echocardiogram or coronary arteriography may be normal.

  The incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is increased.

  Ventricular arrhythmias may result in sudden cardiac death.

  These patients may have a family history of sudden cardiac death.

  Congenital short QT syndrome is very very rare.




Electrocardiographic features of short QT syndrome

  The QT interval < 320 ms.

  The QT interval
fails to increase during bradycardia.

  The
ST segment is virtually absent. The QRS complex seems to connect directly to the T wave.

  There may be
tall and peaked T waves with narrow bases, especially in precordial leads.

 
Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation attacks may be observed.



Acquired causes of short QT interval

  Digoxin

  Mexiletine

  Rufinamide

  Hyperkalemia

  Hypercalcemia

  Acidosis

  Hyperthermia




Reference

  Cardiol Rev 2009;17(6):300-3.





ECG 1. Congenital short QT syndrome. There is almost no ST segment. Narrow-based, tall and peaked T waves are observed in
chest leads. Congenital short QT interval syndrome was first described by Dr. Preben Bjerregaard in 1999.

Prof Dr. Preben Bjerregaard has donated this ECG to our website.


Click here for a more detailed ECG

Click here to visit Prof Dr. Preben Bjerregaard's website on Short QT Interval Syndrome.





ECG 2a. The limb leads of a patient with short QT syndrome.

This ECG has been donated by Dr. Rainer Schimpf (rainer.schimpf@umm.de) to our website.

Click here for a more detailed ECG




ECG 2b. The chest leads of the same patient with the short QT interval syndrome.

Dr. Rainer Schimpf (rainer.schimpf@umm.de) has donated this ECG to our website.

Click here for a more detailed ECG





ECG 3. SQT3.

This ECG has been donated by Dr. Nicola Monteforte (nicola.monteforte@fsm.it) and Prof. Silvia Priori to our website.

Click here for a more detailed ECG