ECG abnormalities that may be observed in patients with congenital absence of the pericardium

  Right axis deviation.

  Right bundle branch block (usually incomplete RBBB).

  Poor R wave progression in anterior leads.

  Tall and peaked P waves in right precordial leads (V1-V3).

  QRS alternance during treadmill exercise test (
due to the exaggerated translational movement of heart).



References and links for sample ECGs

  Br Heart J 1986;55:405-407.

  Circulation 2010;121:1272-1274.

  Circulation 2007;116:e126-e129.

  Rev Port Cardiol 2003;22:801-810.

  Ulster Med J 1988;57:90-92.

  Clin Cardiol 2010;33:E52-57.

  J Electrocardiol 1981;14:413.





ECG 1. The ECG above, belongs to a patient with congenital complete absence of the left pericardium.

Dr. Jean-Christophe EICHER has donated the above ECG.

Click here for a more detailed ECG





ECG 2. The ECG above, belongs to a patient with congenital complete absence of the left pericardium.

Dr. Jean-Christophe EICHER has donated the above ECG.

Click here for a more detailed ECG





ECG 3. The ECG above belongs to a 32 years-old with congenital absence of the pericardium.
The ECG shows poor R wave progression in the precordial leads.

Click here for a more detailed ECG

The ECG above has been used with the permission of Anatolian Journal of Cardiology and AVES Publishing.

Click here to read the relevant article of Dr. Muammer Cumhur Sivrikoz et al.